Microsoft Sheds Reputation as an Easy Mark for Hackers

microsoft cybersecurity defense center

After years of being viewed as the least secure software manufacturer in the market, Microsoft has done a complete “180” by changing its approach to software and security.

These efforts have resulted in a Microsoft that’s now ranked among the most secure software and Cloud developers in the world.

Welcome to Microsoft’s Cybersecurity Defense Operations Center

It wasn’t long after current Chief Executive Satya Nadella took the reins that the way security was handled started to change. One of the most obvious problems he noted off the bat was that corporate divisions prevented security managers from networking and sharing ideas.

He started to undo the security segregation by implementing monthly meetings with security managers from across the company to discuss industry trends and examine current threats. Next, Nadella consolidated and changed the way that Microsoft watched the Internet for hacker attacks. He also increased the payout for any hackers willing to come forward with new security holes in Microsoft products to encourage more cooperation with the hacking community.

Microsoft Ups Its Security Game 

Because Cloud computing relies on the security of outside data centers to be really successful, Microsoft has seriously upped its game when it comes to overall security, largely to protect its Cloud business. The company now spends over $1 billion each year on security-related acquisitions and the number of security employees at the company have increased 20 percent in the last year alone.

But even that’s not the most impressive part of the new secure Microsoft. The Cybersecurity Defense Operations Center, a single facility housing all Microsoft’s security personnel, is the pinnacle of all of these efforts. Here, in rooms outfitted with large televisions displaying up-to-the-minute data on malware and other known threats, Microsoft’s greatest security minds will finally be in the same place all the time.

By moving all security operations together, the hope is that Microsoft will be able to respond even more quickly to active security threats. Thwarting hackers is now Priority One at Microsoft. With the introduction of Windows 10, Windows Hello has made it possible for users to log in using a fingerprint scan, iris scan or facial image instead of passwords that are often the source of data breaches.

The new, more secure Microsoft promises to undo a lot of the past damage the brand has suffered to its reputation. It’s too soon, though, to know if these efforts will be enough to win back former customers who fled after data security problems were brought to light.


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